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Novak Djokovic explains why Andy Murray remains a real threat at the Australian Open

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The pair have met four times in the Australian Open final (Picture: Anadolu Agency/Getty)

Andy Murray and Novak Djokovic have met four times in the final of the Australian Open, but the pair could well be drawn together in round one in 2019.

The Brit – a five-time runner-up at Melbourne Park – has not competed at the first Grand Slam of the season since a surprise loss to Mischa Zverev two years ago but is primed for a return in the new year.

Though he enters the tournament using his protected ranking of world No. 2 the Scot will not be seeded, meaning he could meet top seed Djokovic in the first match of the tournament.

Djokovic is largely viewed as the favourite to claim a record seventh title in Melbourne – although defending champion Roger Federer is chasing the same feat – but he suggested he would be concerned by any early meeting with three-time Grand Slam winner Murray.

Murray is on the comeback trail (Picture:Getty Images)

Short on fitness in 2018, the world No. 256 only competed at six tournaments and has admitted hes still feeling pain in his problem hip despite an extended off season.

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But Djokovic believes Murray remains a huge threat to the tours best players due to his elite mentality.

Hes always going to be the No. 1 because he was No. 1 in the world and a multiple Grand Slam winner so he has the No. 1 in the world and champions mentality, he told BeIn Sports during his winning run at the Mubadala World Tennis Championship.

Djokovic is viewed as the danger man in Australia (Picture: Getty)

Ive known him since we were 11 or 12 years old and I have tonnes of respect for him, for his game and his dedication and devotion to training methods and ethics.

Hes a very humble guy, very respectful of the game and his peers so its going to be very interesting to see.

I always see him as a top player regardless of his ranking.

Murray will begin his Australian Open preparation in Brisbane and faces home favourite James Duckworth in round one, while Djokovic takes on Damir Dzumhur in Doha.

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Sports

Novak Djokovic explains why Andy Murray remains a real threat at the Australian Open

author image

The pair have met four times in the Australian Open final (Picture: Anadolu Agency/Getty)

Andy Murray and Novak Djokovic have met four times in the final of the Australian Open, but the pair could well be drawn together in round one in 2019.

The Brit – a five-time runner-up at Melbourne Park – has not competed at the first Grand Slam of the season since a surprise loss to Mischa Zverev two years ago but is primed for a return in the new year.

Though he enters the tournament using his protected ranking of world No. 2 the Scot will not be seeded, meaning he could meet top seed Djokovic in the first match of the tournament.

Djokovic is largely viewed as the favourite to claim a record seventh title in Melbourne – although defending champion Roger Federer is chasing the same feat – but he suggested he would be concerned by any early meeting with three-time Grand Slam winner Murray.

Murray is on the comeback trail (Picture:Getty Images)

Short on fitness in 2018, the world No. 256 only competed at six tournaments and has admitted hes still feeling pain in his problem hip despite an extended off season.

Advertisement Advertisement

But Djokovic believes Murray remains a huge threat to the tours best players due to his elite mentality.

Hes always going to be the No. 1 because he was No. 1 in the world and a multiple Grand Slam winner so he has the No. 1 in the world and champions mentality, he told BeIn Sports during his winning run at the Mubadala World Tennis Championship.

Djokovic is viewed as the danger man in Australia (Picture: Getty)

Ive known him since we were 11 or 12 years old and I have tonnes of respect for him, for his game and his dedication and devotion to training methods and ethics.Read More »

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